Fundació Joan Miró

In 1957 the artist Joan Miró created a venue in Barcelona where his works of art could be researched and made available to a wider public. This space, the Fundació Joan Miró, contacted Hey in 2016 to design the visual identity for one of their temporary exhibitions. Endgame: Duchamp, Chess, and the Avant-Garde reinterpreted modern art history through its relationship with chess. It ran for three months and exhibited works from numerous twentieth century artists.

 

We came up with a proposal where both the visual and conceptual focus was on avant-garde cubism. We played with the fragmentation and superposition of surfaces echoing what cubist artists did at the beginning of twentieth century. We decided to combine graphic design with images from paintings in the exhibition (such as Simultaneous Dresses by Sonia Delaunay or Motor, Laboratory of Ideas by Jean Crotti).

Cubist masterpieces where a chessboard appears were selected so we could create a new image where the board runs through the painting invading the whole work. We wanted to create a confusion between the artwork and the chessboard in much the same way that Juan Gris and Fernand Léger did in their paintings. This approach also allowed us to create a flexible visual system which could be adapted to numerous formats and sizes.

 

The design was applied to different communication and information material such as the exhibition poster, the opening invitations, the programme (in four languages) and the indoors signage.     

 

Photography Enric Badrinas.

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In 1957 the artist Joan Miró created a venue in Barcelona where his works of art could be researched and made available to a wider public. This space, the Fundació Joan Miró, contacted Hey in 2016 to design the visual identity for one of their temporary exhibitions. Endgame: Duchamp, Chess, and the Avant-Garde reinterpreted modern art history through its relationship with chess. It ran for three months and exhibited works from numerous twentieth century artists.

 

We came up with a proposal where both the visual and conceptual focus was on avant-garde cubism. We played with the fragmentation and superposition of surfaces echoing what cubist artists did at the beginning of twentieth century. We decided to combine graphic design with images from paintings in the exhibition (such as Simultaneous Dresses by Sonia Delaunay or Motor, Laboratory of Ideas by Jean Crotti).

Cubist masterpieces where a chessboard appears were selected so we could create a new image where the board runs through the painting invading the whole work. We wanted to create a confusion between the artwork and the chessboard in much the same way that Juan Gris and Fernand Léger did in their paintings. This approach also allowed us to create a flexible visual system which could be adapted to numerous formats and sizes.

 

The design was applied to different communication and information material such as the exhibition poster, the opening invitations, the programme (in four languages) and the indoors signage.     

 

Photography Enric Badrinas.

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